Vegetation of Israel and Neighboring Countries

Vegetation of Israel and Neighboring Countries

Israel is a transition area from the Mediterranean forests in the northern part of the country, through bathas and herbaceous vegetation of the eastern parts of the country, to shrub-steppes of the Negev Highlands, and extreme desert areas supporting contracted vegetation in the southern Negev. Tropical savannoid vegetation is developed in warm parts of the country. We’ll present here vegetation maps at various scale and deal with their relationships to their habitats.

We would like to thank Barbara Gingold and Miriam Webber for helping with the English edition of this section.

Botany of the Shroud

Botany of the Shroud

2010

This book details Prof. Danin’s research in regards to the botanical remains on the “Shroud of Turin”.

Desert Vegetation of Israel and Sinai

Desert Vegetation of Israel and Sinai

1983

The English version of the book “Negev Vegetation” (Hebrew), including additional parts relating to the vegetation in Sinai.

Flowers of Jerusalem (English & French)

Flowers of Jerusalem (English & French)

1972

The English+French version of the Hebrew book “Flowers of Jerusalem”

Flowers of Jerusalem (Hebrew)

Flowers of Jerusalem (Hebrew)

1972

הצמחים המוצגים בספר זה הם מבעלי הפרחים הבולטים שבסביבת ירושלים.

Negev Vegetation (Hebrew)

Negev Vegetation (Hebrew)

1977

As a highschool student I accompanied the late Prof. Naftali Tadmor, who investigated the natural pasture in the Har Ha’Negev area. He has raised my initial drive to study the vegetation of the Negev. In my work at the Hebrew University, I’ve carried out research for both my Master’s and my Ph.D, mapping the plant communities and their connection to plants and rock.

Plant Stories

Plant Stories

For the benefit of our readers who might feel that our website is too “botanical,” I thought I would try and present “tales” that do not require prior knowledge.

Vegetation of Israel

Vegetation of Israel

1999

The main goal of this volume is to present and improve on the phytosociological work carried on in Israel so far, to distinguish between plant communities in the desert and the sands of the Israeli coastal plain, and to give them appropriate names. It follows the definition guidelines for plant communities as accepted in international phytosociological research organizations.